Chinese Menu Comedy
September 25

posted in: theater-2009 | 0

Chinese Menu Improv Comedy

September 25 at 7:30pm, October 2 at 10:00pm

$8 / $5 DCAC Members

For Reservations: Call DCAC at 202­462­7833

A special late night improv show with Peter Bergen!

The Journey
Feb 8 – 11, 14

posted in: theater-2009 | 0

SCHEDULE: Feb 8, 11 & 14 at 7:30pm, Feb 9 & 10 at 10pm, Feb 11 at 3pm

ADMISSION: $15 / $10 DCAC members.

For reservations call DCAC at (202) 462­7833.

The Journey is a two-person comedy in which Kamau and Imani meet in a mall in Washington,DC. Imani is a paralegal who just passed the bar, is visiting from Idaho and it is her last day in town. She meets Kamau who is a different type of professional clown, but they hit it off right away, so they decide to spend the rest of the day together. She gives him her number but he loses it, which launched into a journey across the country to try and find her.

The Sistas of the Shaketown Tribe
Oct.3

posted in: theater-2009 | 0

October 3 at 7:30pm

For reservations call DCAC at 202­462­7833

The Young Women’s Drumming Empowerment Project (YWDEP) showcase their talent in this masterful collection of spoken word poetry, West African rhythms, songs and dances, along with original music and movementchoreography. Themes include breaking stereotypes, finding strength through trauma and setting positive examplesfor today’s children and youth.For more upcoming YWDEP performances go to Youngwomendrum.orgRead more on YWDEP in this recent dcist.com profile

spooky dogs and the teenage-gang mysteries

posted in: theater-2009 | 0

Friday and Saturday at 7:30pm

$18/ $14 DCAC Members (at the door)For Reservations: ​www.landlesstheatrecompany.org

An irreverent parody of Saturday morning cartoons – for adults only. The Teen­Age Mystery Gang will confront theirown burgeoning sexual desires, tasty dog treats with unexpected side effects, and a surprise penchant for busting amove. SPOOKY DOG uncovers hilarious, hidden subtext with razor­sharp wit and affectionate homage. You’ll neversee Saturday morning the same way again!

Visions in Feminism Art Night
March 9th

posted in: theater-2009 | 0

schedule: March 29 at 10:00

admission: $12 / $10 DCAC  membersreservations: call DCAC at 202.462.7833

The8thAnnualVisionsinFeminismArtNight!ABenefitforHelpingIndividualProstitutesSurvive(HIPS).Pleasejoinusafterour8thannualconferenceforacelebrationincludingBelly Dancers, Burlesque, Spoken word poetry, and Local DC musicians Equinox.

Yoni Ki Baat DC (Talks of the Vagina)
June27, 28

posted in: theater-2009 | 0

Saheli 2 Saheli presents Yoni Ki Baat DC (Talks of the Vagina)

June 27 at 3:00pm, June 28 at 3:00pm and 7:30pm

$10/ $8 DCAC Members For Reservations: Call DCAC at 202­462­7833

DC area women if your vagina could speak what would it say? Yoni Ki Baat (talk of the vagina) is a South Asian American interpretation of the VaginaMonologues. This show was initially performed by the South Asian Sisters in Berkeley,California. The show has been produced at the University of Michigan, Rutgers, Chicago, andin other cities. Saheli 2 Saheli would like to bring to you a completely original show. Webelieve that DC women are ready to speak out about their bodies, sexualities, and yes, theiryonis. (yoni= vagina in Sanskrit)We would like to thank the Asian/Pacific Islander Domestic Violence Resource Project(DVRP) for their generous support! Proceeds from our show will benefit DVRP in theWashington, D.C. area

Will She Love Me When I’m 64?
December 17

posted in: theater-2009 | 0

Will She Love Me When I’m 64?

Thursday, December 17 at 7:30pm

$5/ $3 DCAC MembersFor reservations call DCAC at 202­462­7833

Upon hearing about the retirement of his idol, DC based emcee Jazz reevaluates his own career and questions if hisstruggles in the music industry will ever pay off. At the same time, Jazz’s manager Schooley, usually sketchy with hisconnects, may have finally found an opportunity that will take Jazz to the next level. Meanwhile Jazz, Jazz has beentrying to steer his best friend and homie Mo off the streets. Mo has just completed serving time in DC central cell afterhis cousin Derrick was murdered last summer. Mo has several side hustles and is a self­proclaimed “streetcounselor”. Jazz’s father was never sold on his son pursuing hip hop as a career. Will She Love Me When I’m 64 is amultimedia production that follows Jazz as he tries to figure out where he fits in an industry that boasts youthfulswagger, streets tales and fast turnover. The production touches on the themes of ageism, the jail system,educational system, youth violence and fatherhood.

Walmartopia!

posted in: theater-2009 | 0

Landless Theatre Company presents Walmartopia!

Thursday ­ Saturday, 7:30pm, Sunday at 3:00pm

$25/ $18 DCAC Members (at the door)For Reservations: www.landlesstheatrecompany.orgThis Off­Broadway hit tells the hilarious and timely tale of a single mom andWal­Mart employee who speaks out against her company’s working conditionsand finds herself and her young daughter jettisoned to 2036, into a futurewhere Wal­Mart dominates the entire world. Yes, the musical features thesinging head of Wal­Mart founder Sam Walton.

Will Schneider-White, Anhedonia
September 12 – October 12

posted in: gallery-2008 | 0

Anhedonia

Will Schneider-White
Curated by Sarah Tanguy

September 12 – October 12, 2008

Opening Reception: Friday, September 12, 7-9pm

Two upcoming art exhibitions celebrate the life and legacy of late arts patron Herb White. The
Washington Arts Museum presents Herb White: A Taste for Art, an exhibition of work from White’s collection.
Meanwhile, DC Arts Center presents its 2008 Herb’s Choice show,Anhedonia: Recent Work by Will Schneider-White. While the show at WAM highlights White’s love of art and his collection of both local and national artists, Herb’s Choice 2008 continutes DCAC’s annual tradition of allowing Herb to curate, conceptualize or otherwise inspire one show in the gallery every year.

White, who passed away on June 8, 2007, was a tireless supporter of the arts in DC and surrounding areas. White made a name for himself both in DC’s real estate maket and through his two popular restaurants, both called Herb’s, near Dupont Circle. He staged countless benefits for theaters, ballet troupes and writers’ groups at his restaurants, while serving on the boards of a wide variety of arts organizations. White founded the DC Arts Center in a building he owned in Adams Morgan, charging an annual rent of $1. Over those years he was instrumental in making sure that there was a place in DC for new, emerging, off-beat and adventurous artists to show their work and develop their craft. Without his vision and support, DC would not have the vibrant visual, literary and performing arts communities it enjoys today.

Learn-a-palooza, Curated by Lea-Ann Bigelow
May 2 – May 11

posted in: gallery-2008, sparkplug | 0

DCAC’s Sparkplug
Learn-a-palooza
Jenny Walton, Karen Joan Topping, Mark Planisek, Michael Matason, Kathryn McDonnell, Lisa McCarty, Peter Gordon, Deborah Carroll-Anzinger
Curated by Lea-Ann Bigelow

May 2 – May 11, 2008

Opening Reception: May 2, 7 – 9pm

Learn-a-palooza with DCAC’s Sparkplug: May 10, 3 – 6pm

DC Arts Center’s resident collective Sparkplug launches its first exhibition as part of an
ongoing pursuit of adventures beyond the commercial gallery system. Sparkplug is a
gathering of a dozen or so Washington, DC metro area emerging artists, curators and
writers that meet once a month to discuss their work, explore common concerns and
ideas, grow their community, and dream up creative engagements both in DC and
around the globe.

Learnapalooza DC is a community organized event happening on Saturday, May 10.
Businesses, homes, and community centers in Adams Morgan, U St, Dupont, and
Columbia Heights will open their doors to hold short “classes” on every topic under the sun. DCAC’s resident collective Sparkplug hosts three classes:

Artist Materials 101: 2:30 PM to 3:00 PM taught by artist, Jenny Walton

Stretching Your Own Canvas: 3:30 PM to 4:00 PM taught by artist, Peter Gordon

Framing Tips: 4:30 PM to 5:00 PM taught by artist and museum preparator, Mark
Planisek

Amy Lin, Obsession
December 15 – January 14

posted in: gallery-2006 | 0

Obsession
Amy Lin
Curated by Anne Collins Goodyear, assistant curator of prints+drawings at the National Portrait Gallery

December 15 – January 14, 2007

Opening Reception: Friday, December 15, 7-9pm

With a soaring blue mass anchored above a small pink enclosure, “Separate Worlds” reads almost like a question mark. The comparison is apt where Amy Lin’s work is concerned. Enveloped in the artist’s meticulously rendered drawings is an implicit question: what are they? It is precisely in their resistance to easy categorization that the works reach out to spectators.

Lin’s work, with an exquisite calligraphic quality of interweaving cables, is composed of tiny spheres, rendered painstakingly, at varying scales, by the artist. Yet the work does not read as pure abstraction, concerned only with formal properties of color and composition. Instead, a careful examination of these lively surfaces reveals fascinating intersections between the minute units themselves—microbes of a sort— some of which seem to cohere with magnetic pull while others seem to resist one another. Through her use of pattern and repetition Lin has put into play dynamics that seem almost human in nature.

If the artist’s intensity, or “obsession,” reveals itself graphically, the work also brings about a deep sense of contemplative satisfaction. For through an act of meditative creation, Lin has constructed pictorial environments that produce a sense of immense space. Here the viewer can become lost in the delicate task of untangling skeins of threaded dots that tease the mind. – Anne Colins Goodyear

The New Future, curated by Kristina Bilonick
December 14 – January 14

posted in: gallery-2007 | 0

The New Future
Urban Scout, Jane Doskow, Jo Wonder, Benjamin Edwards
Curated by Kristina Bilonick

December 14 – January 14

Opening Reception: Friday, December 14, 7-9pm

In the 50’s and 60s projections of the future ran rampant. TV shows like the Jetsons showed a civilization with conveyor-belt sidewalks, automated houses and robotic maids, Sci-Fi authors like Arthur C. Clarke and Ray Bradbury wove tales of space travel and new colonies on Mars. Fashion and architecture shone with metallics and repeated boomerang shapes.
Fast forward 50 years, and things are a little different than expected. There are no moving
sidewalks, and we’re using the same space rockets that launched 50 years ago.
The artists in this show bring you a ‘new future’- not as shiny and new as the ‘old future’ but not dull either. Together, they present a mash-up of the past, present and future- leaving the viewer with ideas of what the next 50 years may have in store.

Manon Cleary, Skyscapes
October 12 – November 4

posted in: gallery-2007 | 0

Herb’s Choice
Skyscapes
Manon Cleary
Curated by Lee-Ann Bigelow

October 12 – November 4

Opening Reception: Friday, October 12, 7-9pm

Manon Catherine Cleary – by any earthly measure – is a luminary among Washington DC
artists. Globally exhibited and collected, Cleary has enjoyed a forty-year career as an artist and teacher, and is principally acclaimed for her virtuosic and conceptually provocative enlistment of oil paint and graphite to photo-realist ends. It is with great honor, then, that DC Arts Center will showcase the artist’s very newest “skyscapes” in its gallery during the month of October – works rendered and mounted in remembrance of Cleary’s dear friend and DCAC founder and patron Herb White, in whose company she spent countless contented hours “chasing clouds.

Dos Pestañeos – Every Last Day
September 14, 2007

posted in: gallery-2007 | 0


Dos Pestañeos – Every Last Day

opening reception Friday, Sept. 14 7-9pm
Sept. 14 – Oct. 7

Dos Pestañeos is an artist collective formed in Atlanta , GA that curates and collaborates with
local, national, and international artists.

Every Last Day is a contemplation of the fertile terrain of the in-between, and exploration of transitions. Perceiving the threshold as an intermediate space charged with possibility and quite possibly haunted, the collective and invited artists have shaped an exhibition of magic, ignorance, illusion, uncertainty and pleasure. For more info on Dos Pestañeos visit their

site: www.dospestaneos.com

Dos Pestañeos, Every Last Day
September 14-October 7

posted in: gallery-2007 | 0

Dos Pestañeos presents
Every Last Day
Ben Fain (Miami), Matthew Farrell (NYC), Vivienne Griffin (Dublin), Hope Hilton (Atlanta), Leigh Horowitz (NYC), Scott Lawrence (Atlanta), Vanessa Mayoraz (Geneva), David Prince (Los Angeles), Andrew Ross (Chicago), Skote Collective (Atlanta) and Alex White with Lori Scacco (NYC).

September 14 – October 7, 2007

Opening Reception: Friday, September 14, 7-9pm

 

Schedule of Events:

September 14: Hope Hilton leads a 20-minute walk in complete silence @ 6PM as part of performances happening at the same time all over the world; in conjunction with the Conflux Festival (conflux.org, 21citiesatonceperformed.info)

September 14: Opening Reception, 7-9pm

September 16: Gallery Talk w/ Dos Pestañeos Collective, 7:30PM

September 30: Gallery Talk w/ Skote Collective, 7:30PM

October 7: I See D.C.: Bridget Donahue, Kate McNamara and Hope Hilton (Brooklyn) discuss Washington D.C. and what they see happening, with a reception + book release following the discussion, 7:30PM

 

Dos Pestañeos has no idea where you came from but wants to show you something.

With its heart contemplating the fertile terrain of the in-between, Dos Pestañeos presents Every Last Day, an exploration into the potential of transitional reality. Perceiving the threshold as an intermediate space charged with possibility and quite possibly haunted, the collective has shaped an exhibition of magic, ignorance, illusion, uncertainty and pleasure. Without regard for classifications or dichotomies, the artists have instead worked within the “excluded middle”, the wish being to give breath to the complex, vital state of flux- a realm of the sacred, the taboo, and the mysterious. The shaman mediated between humans and gods, ghosts existed between life and death, werewolves between man and animal: this is the anti-structure of limbo, the capacity of every last day.

In this exhibition everywhere is the entrance and formality becomes a fiction. Unforeseen relationships emerge as the narrative continues to open. By physically pushing the boundaries of each artist’s work into the next, assumptions and architectures shift, perpetuating a community that shares and speaks together.

Included are works in a variety of media and methods: Andrew Ross includes anthropological scenes constructed from simple office paper. Leigh Horowitz creates drawings using a personal hieroglyphic system of charting dreams, while Vivienne Griffin’s text works remind us that powerful moments can be realized with very small statements.

Stay with us.

Dos Pestañeos is an artist collective formed in Atlanta, Georgia in 2003 that curates and collaborates with local, national, and international artists in self-produced exhibitions. www.dospestaneos.com

High resolution images available upon request.

AMERICAN IDOLATRY
June 8, 2007

posted in: gallery-2007 | 0

 

AMERICAN IDOLATRY
By: Kate Hardy

June 8 – July 8, 2007
Opening Reception: Friday, June 8, 7 – 9pm
Artist & Curator Talk, 8pm

A curatorial project organized by: Anne Surak
Assisted by Margaret Boozer and Claire Huschle

A site-specific installation by Kate Hardy that examines the ever-increasing existence of art as a
commodity and explores the abstract value attributed to consumer goods in a capitalist society.

‘American Idolatry’ is a conceptual artwork that aims to be accessible in its content, visual appeal, pricing, and the collaborative action of exchange. I am presenting the audience with objects that appeal to me. Familiar objects: toys, knick-knacks, souvenirs, etc. They are objects that I have collected from thrift stores, found on the streets of DC or have been given to me by friends. They are a set of unique collectibles. They are not things that I necessarily need but they are things that I want to have. The artist, the consumer and the collector in me would like to have them. Their value system is based on my own personal relationships with and associations to them. They have been ranked and priced according to my preference, and I am presenting them in a gallery setting where by purchasing an object, you will be participating in the completion of the piece. — Kate Hardy

…Hardy’s installation is a conceptual piece that discusses the commodification of artworks as well as subverting the typical protocol of the art market. Projects like this do not attempt to bypass the valorization and commodification of the work, but instead embrace it. It is this embrace that completes the work of art. The artistic act is the interactive process of shopping. — Anne Surak

This exhibit was made possible by a generous grant from the Warhol Foundation to support the DCAC Curatorial Initiative which helps develop and mentor emerging curators in Washington DC.

Kate Hardy, American Idolatry
June 8 – July 8

posted in: curatorial-initiative, gallery-2007 | 0

American Idolatry
DCAC’s Curatorial Initiative
Kate Hardy
Curated by Anne Surak
Assisted by Margaret Boozer and Claire Huschle

June 8 – July 8, 2007

Opening Reception: Friday, June 8, 7-9pm

A site-specific installation by Kate Hardy that examines the ever-increasing existence of art as a commodity and explores the abstract value attributed to consumer goods in a capitalist society.

 

‘American Idolatry’ is a conceptual artwork that aims to be
accessible in its content, visual appeal, pricing, and the collaborative action
of exchange. I am presenting the audience with objects that appeal to me.
Familiar objects: toys, knick-knacks, souvenirs, etc. They are objects that I have
collected from thrift stores, found on the streets of DC or have been given
to me by friends. They are a set of unique collectibles. They are not things
that I necessarily need but they are things that I want to have. The artist,
the consumer and the collector in me would like to have them. Their value
system is based on my own personal relationships with and associations to
them. They have been ranked and priced according to my preference, and I
am presenting them in a gallery setting where by purchasing an object, you
will be participating in the completion of the piece.
— Kate Hardy

…Hardy’s installation is a conceptual piece that discusses the commodification
of artworks as well as subverting the typical protocol of the
art market. Projects like this do not attempt to bypass the valorization and
commodification of the work, but instead embrace it. It is this embrace
that completes the work of art. The artistic act is the interactive process of
shopping.
— Anne Surak

This exhibit was made possible by a generous grant from the Warhol Foundation to support the DCAC Curatorial Initiative which helps develop and mentor emerging curators in Washington DC.

Jeffrey Cudlin & Meg Mitchell, Ian and Jan: The Undiscovered Duo
May 11 – June 3

posted in: gallery-2007 | 0

Ian and Jan: The Undiscovered Duo
Jeffrey Cudlin and Meg MItchell
Exhibition advisors: Rex Weil & Central Intelligence Art

May 11 – June 3, 2007

Opening reception: Friday, May 11, 7-9pm

This spring, many local museums and galleries will celebrate the Washington Color School , a group of abstract painters who, in the early 1960s, briefly made D.C. the center of the visual arts universe.

Local artists Jeffry Cudlin and Meg Mitchell won’t be playing along. At DCAC, the two will stage an art historical intervention, weaving an alternative history for Washington art.

Cudlin and Mitchell will mount a retrospective for their alter egos, Ian and Jan—a fictitious husband-and-wife performance art duo. According to the exhibition’s premise, Ian and Jan led the Washington Body School , a group that, in the late ‘60s and ‘70s, exhibited their body art alongside the work of prominent Washington abstract painters.

Ian and Jan: The Washington Body School will provide humorous commentary on Washington ’s cultural legacy, on revisionist art historical agendas, and on gender bias and power politics in the arts. The show will include photographs, drawings, props, and videos of the couple in action.

The centerpiece of the show will be a video featuring interviews with D.C. gallerists, collectors, and historians, all recalling the rich, heretofore unexplored history of these two obscure performance artists. Participants in the video include: Jonathan Binstock, Curator for Contemporary Art at the Corcoran Gallery of Art; Sam Gilliam, celebrated artist; J. W. Mahoney, contributing writer and editor for Art in America; Joshua Shannon, Professor of Contemporary Art History at The University of Maryland, College Park; Andrea Pollan, Director of Curator’s Office; Janis Goodman, critic for WETA’s Around Town and instructor of art at the Corcoran College of Art and Design; and Tyler Green, blogger for Arts Journal and contributing writer for Fortune magazine and The Wall Street Journal.

Though the show exists as a parody, it also investigates the seductive power of master narratives, even discredited or demonstrably false ones. Ian and Jan may make you laugh, but they will also change the way you think about the business of cultural production—and Washington , D.C. — forever.

 

American Icons through Indigenous Eyes, curated by Suzan Shown Harjo
April 13 – May 6

posted in: curatorial-initiative, gallery-2007 | 0

DCAC’s Curatorial Initiative
American Icons through Indigenous Eyes
Curated by Suzan Shown Harjo

April 13 – May 5

Opening Reception: Friday, April 13, 7-9pm
Closing Reception: Sunday, May 5, 3pm

Twelve Native American artists in an exhibit curated by Suzan Shown Harjo ( Cheyenne and
Hodulgee Muscogee).

The views of most Native American people are never heard or seen by anyone near the shores of the Potomac. But that doesn’t stop a lot of folks in Washington , D.C. from believing they know who Native Peoples are, what we think and what’s best for us. ..I wanted to curate a show that would expose Washingtonians to unfiltered views of some Native people outside D.C. After settling on the broad exhibit theme, I contacted a dozen topnotch Native American artists, with an open-ended request for new or existing work on any subject they wanted to address in the nation’s Capitol.
-Suzan Shown Harjo, curator

Check out the Washington Post review here:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wpdyn/content/article/2007/04/12/AR2007041201748.html

*This exhibition was made possible by a generous grant from the Warhol Foundation to support the
DCAC Curatorial Initiative which helps develop & mentor emerging curators in Washington , DC .