***From The Archives***
BADC Presents: Emancipation: Meditations on Freedom
November 22, 2013 – January 5, 2014

posted in: gallery-2013, gallery-current | 0

***From The Archives***

Black Artists of DC Presents:
Emancipation: Meditations on Freedom

Curated by Esther Iverem

November 22, 2013 – January 5, 2014

Opening Reception: November 22, 7-9 PM
Closing Reception: January 5, 2014, 2‐ 5pm

Daniel T. Brookings, Suzanne Broughel, Hebron Chism, Jenai Asemoa Davis, Carolyn Goodridge, Esther Iverem, Hubert Jackson, Jacqueline Lee, Elizabeth Sturges Llerena, Magruder Murray, Kisasi Ramsess, Gail Shaw-Clemons, Russell Simmons, Sidney Thomas, Eugene Vango, Curtis Woody.

Exhibition Jurors: Akili Ron Anderson, artist and educator and Alec Simpson, artist.

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation in the United States. Though the proclamation—which freed millions of African descendants from bondage—is the starting point, this show will also explore various aspects of emancipation, from the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual, to the social, economic and political realms as well. What does emancipation or freedom mean in the year 2013 compared to the year 1863,or throughout the millennia of human history? What is the meaning of freedom for different populations on the globe, or how has emancipation impacted relationships between different populations? How has technology altered our ideas about freedom? What does it mean to be free?

 

***Click on photos to enlarge***

 

 

 

 

Nano Gallery: Talismans
Small works by Joanne Kent
February 28th – May 18th

Talismans

work by Joanne Kent
February 28, 2020 – May 17, 2020

Reception with the artist: March 13, 2020, 7-9pm  POSTPONED

Talismans invite us on a path to introspection, to meditate and to conjure. Any object made with specific intentions can serve as such. Because art is imbued with the energy of its making, it can act as talismans and energize the space it inhabits. The sculpted and textured hues of the small works in this show are organic and visceral, and hopefully will assist the viewer in a reconnection with and respect for the manifested power contained in art and the nuanced abstractions of nature’s and life’s bits and pieces.

Kent, a Minnesota native, holds an MFA from the University of  Minnesota. She has been living and working in DC for several decades. Her work is mostly heavily impastoed and reductive in nature, crossing the lines between painting and sculpture.  In addition to oil paint on canvas, this show contains several of her constructed wall sculptures. Her work is non narrative and focuses on the intrinsic qualities of the materials and its materiality, in addition to the process of making the work, which often takes months or even years to complete. 

***IN ACCORDANCE WITH CDC PROTOCOL CONCERNING  THE COVID-19 VIRUS, THIS RECEPTION WITH THE ARTIST HAS BEEN POSTPONED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. OUR GALLERY HOWEVER, WILL REMAIN DURING OUR REGULAR HOURS 2-7PM, WEDS-SUN.  PLEASE CHECK BACK AT DCARTSCENTER.ORG FOR FUTURE INFORMATION***

***From The Archives***
Curatorial Initiative: Public Displays of Privacy, curated by Martina Dodd,
September 9 – October 16, 2016

Nakeya Brown, Self Portrait in Shower Cap, 2015, archival inkjet print on cotton rag, 16” x 20”

Curatorial Initiative:

Public Displays of Privacy

Curated by Martina Dodd
Mentor curator, Thomas Drymon

September 9 ­- October 16, 2016

Opening Reception: Friday, September 9, 7-9 pm
Performance + Second Viewing: Thursday, September 29, 6:30-­8:30 pm
Artist Talk and Closing Reception: Sunday, October 16, 5 pm

Nakeya Brown, Adrienne Gaither, Danielle Smith, Khadijah Wilson

DC Arts Center presents Public Displays of Privacy, an exhibition featuring four local women artists who explore the complexities of identity, memory and subjectivity in relation to Black
Womanhood. Performance + second veiwing on September 29 at 6:30 pm: Special performance of Communal Restriction by Khadijah Wilson and Lionel Frazier White. Bond together by a mask constructed by Wilson, the two struggle for independence as they visually transform from collective unit to individual entities, forcing their viewers to reexamine the narratives of self and community.

With a particular focus on hair, the body acts as a site of agency for Nakeya Brown,​ as her photographs draw attention to the ways beauty standards can reflect politics, cultural memories and racial identities. Khadijah Wilson’s ​installation physically binds her subjects together using deconstructed material and applies pressure to their communal existence, causing them to literally tug at their freedom. Their strained necks mimic the double burden of race and gender experienced by Black women, while their limited mobility hints at a loss of individual agency.

Using images of family members as her source of inspiration, Adrienne Gaither​ investigates the social
constructs and constraints of familial ties by “merging traditional techniques of painting and digital
manipulation.”  Danielle Smith’s​ soft brush strokes portray intimate moments of joy, pain and vulnerability as she distinguishes between reality and perception. This group exhibition blurs the lines set in place to demarcate what is kept private and what is for public consumption and examines how personal and collective experiences shape our existence

***From The Archives***
Curatorial Initiative: Studio Sacrilege, curated by Kayleigh Bryant-Greenwell,
September 11 – October 11, 2015

Curatorial Initiative:
Studio Sacrilege

Curated by Kayleigh Bryant-­Greenwell

September 11 ­- October 11, 2015

Opening Reception: Friday, September 11, 7-­9 pm
Gallery Talk: Sunday, October 11, 5 pm

Amy Hughes Braden, Roxana Geffen, and Jackie Milad

We’re conditioned as respectable art patrons to appreciate the art we love at a distance – from beyond the other side of the glass. We’re also conditioned to respect the preciousness of a work of art – that it should be preserved, treasured, literally placed on a pedestal and otherwise untouched, unmoved, indifferent from ourselves and our changing environment. We believe in the permanence of art so much so that “adaptability” is an unheard of characteristic. Art exists in a fixed state and is not thought of as being capable of change.

Surprisingly artists – at least many contemporary artists – feel quite differently. While to us, the art patrons, the mere thought of changing an established artwork brings fears of sacrilegious destruction happening in war-­torn lands across the globe, to artists Amy Hughes Braden, Roxana Geffen, and Jackie Milad, it is simply part of the art-making process. Studio Sacrilege takes the viewer down the rabbit hole of the artist’s real art-making existence, where perfectly good canvases already adorned by paint at the artist’s hand, are frequently reused to create new art – or expand upon ideas from the original piece. Here, the audience must divorce itself from expectations of the exalted artwork to fully appreciate the power of the process. Each artist presents confirmed masterworks worthy of appreciation for aesthetics alone – but what unites them is their uncanny willingness to revisit such works to create anew.

The exhibit explores art’s singular capacity to revisit the past through experiences, processes, and memory in visual form. The perspective of the artist is achingly present as the viewer examines the layers of each work, shocked by the profound completeness of the work underneath, and moved by the beloved process of destruction, manipulation, and recreation. We get a glimpse of the tension, anxiety, thrills, and woes of making of art, for which the artist contends with in everyday practice.

Amy Hughes Braden, Roxana Geffen, and Jackie Milad explore what it means to be an artist through efforts in revisiting and reworking their past. Studio Sacrilege obliterates the norms of preserving and maintaining art in pristine untouched conditions by metaphorically thrusting the viewer out of the gallery and into the artist’s studio.

 

***From The Archives**
Jamea Richmond-Edwards, The Cost of Making her Run: Fear, Flight, Freedom,
March 21 – April 20 2014

posted in: gallery-2014, gallery-current | 0
Sacrifices for Sacrifices, ink and chalk pastel on board, 2014, 40×96 inches

***From the Archives***

The Cost of Making Her Run: Fear, Flight, Freedom

Jamea Richmond-Edwards

March 21 – April 20, 2014

Opening Reception: Friday March 21, 7-9 pm
Gallery Talk & Closing Reception: Sunday, April 20, 2pm

In The Cost of Making Her Run: Fear, Flight, Freedom, Jamea Richmond-Edwards employs intimate portraits of women and dramatic photographs in a complex exploration of her personal cosmos. The works, centered on the dichotomy of self-belief and doubt, are inspired by life experiences, family narratives and the legacy of Harriet Tubman. Addressed are concerns of identity, racial discrimination and subjugation, coupled with artistic challenges and triumph.

As a ballpointist, Richmond-Edwards’ women are composed of swirling orbs and densely scrawled lines. One is seduced by their alluring gazes; some possess self-assuredness, while others reveal vulnerability. Each woman is a metaphor for Richmond-Edwards’ trials and achievements. They are multi-generational, representing various periods in the artist’s life. They exist in an imaginary world where darkness shields them from fear, self-doubt, and those who seek to oppress them. Appearing iridescent under the night sky, these beautiful and powerful lionized figures gather to perform rite and ritual, in a secret community where they draw strength from one another and their ancestors.

This Time, She Ain’t Afraid is a captivating series of photographs in which Richmond-Edwards reenactments Harriett Tubman’s escape from slavery. Inspired by Tubman’s defiance, determination, fearlessness, and resilience Richmond-Edwards evokes her spirit as she seeks to flee the constraints of racial discrimination and obstacles placed by those with perceived notions about her art making.

The compelling drawings in The Cost of Making her Run: Fear, Flight, Freedom and stirring photographs in This Time, She Ain’t Afraid are the embodiment of Richmond-Edwards’ life’s journey and are her testament to overcoming personal fears; in fleeing to find refuge in a world without judgment; and fulfilling her quest for freedom from physical and physiological barriers. As she leaves us to ponder, what is the cost of making her run?

**Click on image to enlarge